The Brief

New Roundtable on Wellbeing in the North of Tyne: calls for evidence

The newly established Roundtable on Wellbeing in the North of Tyne, is calling for evidence to understand how the region can put wellbeing at the heart of the recovery from the pandemic.

The partnership between the Carnegie UK Trust and the North of Tyne Combined Authority brings together experts, local policy makers, and practitioners to think about recovery ‘in the round’ recognising that COVID-19 is a social, health and economic crisis.

The roundtable on Wellbeing in the North of Tyne will explore whether wellbeing offers a useful framing for the recovery: what need to be the priorities, and what data is available to chart progress towards these outcomes.

The roundtable launch comes after a successful online event in December 2020, when many local stakeholders came together to discuss the potential for wellbeing to contribute to the pandemic recovery.

In addition to taking expert evidence and stakeholder submissions, the members of the roundtable will be exploring how to hear the views of people across the North of Tyne Combined Authority to ensure that the recommendations take account of what matters most to citizens.

Making a submission

We would like to hear from individuals, groups, and organisations about the most important issues for the North of Tyne now. By the North of Tyne, we mean anywhere in Northumberland, North Tyneside and Newcastle.

There are two sets of questions to choose from when responding to this call for evidence. You are welcome to choose those that suit you, your organisation, or the people you work with  the best:

Option 1

  1. What are the most important issue for you and other people living and working in the North of Tyne?
  2. What are some of the challenges facing you or your organisation in the North of Tyne right now?
  3. What’s working well in the North of Tyne, especially in relation to those challenges?

Option 2

  1. What are the most important social issues for people living and working in the North of Tyne?
  2. What are the most important environmental issues for people living and working in the North of Tyne?
  3. What are the most important economic issues for people living and working in the North of Tyne?
  4. What are the most important democratic issues for people living and working in the North of Tyne?
  5. What are the most promising approaches to improving social, economic, environmental or democratic wellbeing in the North of Tyne?
  6. What are the biggest barriers to improving social, economic, environmental or democratic wellbeing in the North of Tyne?
  7. What data do you have, or use, about social, economic, environmental or democratic wellbeing in the North of Tyne?

Submissions should be sent via email to [email protected]

 

Please include your name, the name of your organisation (if applicable), and contact details. Your submission will be circulated to members of the Roundtable in full or summary form. The call for evidence will be open until 16 July 2021.

 

Additional Information

SEED domains of wellbeing

When making your submission, it may be helpful to refer to the descriptions of wellbeing, outlined below.

Social wellbeing means everyone can achieve their potential and contribute to society because they have basic needs met. Our basic needs are having access to health and social care, education, housing, transport, digital and childcare.

Environmental wellbeing means everyone has access to green and blue spaces and collectively we live within the planet’s natural resources. This means we protect the environment for future generations.

Economic wellbeing means everyone has a decent minimum living standard and can absorb financial shocks. This means financial security now and being able to maintain adequate income throughout their lifetime.

Democratic wellbeing means everyone has a voice in decisions made that affect them. This means having local and national systems which support participation, foster trust and encourage diversity.

 

Roundtable Members

The Roundtable is co-chaired by Sarah McMillan, Assistant Director of Policy, Northumberland County Council and Professor Mark Shucksmith OBE, Carnegie UK Trust Trustee/Newcastle University.

The members are:

Lorna Smith, Assistant Director of Public Health (Acting) Newcastle City Council

Miatta Fahnbulleh, Chief Executive, New Economics Foundation

Laura Seebohm, Executive Director of External Affairs, Changing Lives

Leigh Mills, Head of Inclusive Growth, NTCA

Liz Robinson, Public Health Manager, Northumberland County Council

Behnam Khazaeli, Senior Public Health Manager, North Tyne Council

Andrea Malcolm, Executive Director of People, Homes and Communities Bernicia

Emma Ward, Research, Evidence and Analysis Programme Manager, North East Local Enterprise Partnership

Robin Fry, Chief Executive, VODA & NTCA VCSE Ambassador

The Roundtable will report to the Inclusive Economy Board of the North of Tyne Combined Authority, before formally reporting to NTCA’s Cabinet in Autumn 2021.

Speak To

Jennifer Wallace

Hannah Ormston

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